This week, New York City announced that as of September 13, 2021 people wanting to do things indoors will be required to show proof of vaccination.

Indoors mean shopping, movies, dining etc…

As the vaccine cards are paper and easily transferable, many establishments already require you to back up your vaccine card with a photo ID.

NYC has a mayoral election this November.

Voting takes place indoors…

Will I be required to show proof of vaccination and ID to vote?

65 thoughts on “Anything Can Happen Friday: ID

  1. Voting in Colorado is the best, they mail out ballets, we simply vote, seal the ballet, sign the ballet and drop it off at the library. Because it is so simple my wife votes now and we talk and research the topics on the ballet (not the candidates). Locally the election office sends out a booklet discussing each topic, the pros, and cons (presented by both sides of the initiative). In your case – yup. I took a picture of my vaccine card so I don’t have to carry it with me. Maybe you will be so lucky.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. As nyc counted sample ballots in the recent primary, and it took a month to come up with winner of primary’s, I don’t see it as a practical solution nor one I trust at all

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Well, the rules are the rules, but I see where you are heading with the question… ie: can this be considered voter suppression, marginalization, etc. I’m in the group with Danny’s earlier comment. We vote by mail exclusively. Yes, there’s a great deal of decisiveness surrounding that as well, but relative to a pandemic, it’s a fabulous option.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I can understand that rule for restaurants where you would eat indoors. And it sounds like a push for more people to get vaccinated. Other than those reasons, I’m scratching my head about the why for the rule. Seems to me that requiring a mask for indoors stuff would be adequate. I’m not an expert on this, though.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. At the restaurant I was on Thursday (Toronto, 16 months of almost continuous lockdown, we’re in stage 3 of lifted restrictions now) they asked for name and phone. Contact tracing. So far, no one has asked for proof of vaccination and I lost track of what the status is on that topic here but I am also aware how fluid the topic is and we too are in a provincial election year…

      Ugh.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I’ve had to provide contact info at many places. Some have asked to see my proof of vaccinations, I also needed a negative test result for a ball game. There’s so many ways to look at this topic

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Good description of saying the situation is fluid. I was optimistic when the news said vaccination sites were no longer crowded. That meant the situation was improving, right? Not so fast! Not with the variant. I live in Maryland, and the county government put back the mask requirement for public places. Now it feels like we’re moving backwards. Ugh is right.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. The thing is, we need to learn to live with this. This is never going away, and COVID 21 is probably here already. But we can’t spend our lives avoiding things. But that’s my opinion.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. For me, it’s continuing to practice safe habits. I didn’t stop wearing a mask while in stores. If there’s a booster vaccine shot, I’ll get that. It’s doing things while being careful.

        Like

  4. You will probably have to show both and I think it’s a good idea. Like Colorado ( Danny Watts says) Florida has mail in ballots. Beats the hell out of standing in line. You would think New York would have a mail-in option too, but hey, it’s New York.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I heard about this and thought Oh dear, if this happens where I live the outcry will be HUGE!
    You do make a good point about voting. Like the others have said mail in will probably be the solution.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. So start the weekend by playing the agent provocateur, why don’t ya? Tossing some fecal matter into a Hot Button parse about picture voter I.D. and basic and temporary pandemic precautions. Go on with your bad self.

    An I.D. is for entry into an inclosed facility, not necessarily to facilitate, or restrict, any and all activities within. But go ahead, let’s all gin this up.

    Your vaccination bonafides to get into the library doesn’t mean you can just check out a book with out a library card, but inversely, it doesn’t mean that if said library or school is hosting a temporary polling area, where you’re registered to vote, you must dupe a presentation of vaccination bonafides to cast a ballot.

    So you may say de facto and I may say de jure and we’re sure to tango with all that for quite a while now… thanks to Delta.

    Interesting post, LA

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I found it interesting to be in Berkeley, CA for a week. I kept leaving the house without a mask — and everyone is wearing masks. It became a requirement while I was there. Now back home in AZ, I was wearing a mask when I’d leave home — and discovered I was the only masked person around. We’re going on vacation in CA next week and it will be interesting to see if they have similar rules like you have. About voting, I’m all for voter ID. My husband’s assistant is Black and liberal. She finds it so offensive that people think Black people don’t have IDs.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. I have to wonder what is special about September 13 instead of, say, the 12th or the 14th or even which month. Did the Wujan lab inject a marker in the virus to make it more virulent on that day or will the virus grow in size so it will no longer filter through a mask thus making masking actually effective? Are the vaccines no longer effective on that date? This would make a good science fiction tale. Move over George Orwell.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. I’ve had great luck with mail in ballots in Florida. Plus, they provide a website and people could track our ballot to make sure it was was received and counted. I got an email update with that info. In a matter of days my ballot was received and counted.
    It was great. If Florida, which can’t do much of anything right, could do this then New York certainly can.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Lots of people under 30 check their mailboxes. It depends on where you live. You live in NYC. Things are different in the suburbs.
        My youngest son, who is now 32, has owned his own home in south Florida and now in Atlanta since his mid twenties. In fact both my sons owned their own homes in their mid 20’s because they had good jobs. One had a town home and the other a patio home (before they both bought larger single family homes. And when in Community homes like that they all have group mail boxes. So of course they picked up their own physical mail. Living in south Florida it’s very common for everyone to check their mail. While most of us do everything on line we still have physical mail boxes. And in Florida the post office is frequently used as well. If you live in a major city it might be different but not in the suburbs.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. My daughter goes to school with kids from around the country, and her nyc friends go to schools all over the country…they’re just not using them…I think the kid that uses a physical mailbox is the exception. Plus, in nyc, I think the stat is out of kids under 30 eligible to vote, only something like 25% were actually registered, and only half of that number actually voted…and that was a presidential…so paper is not the way to go to attract younger voters

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Gee that’s really disappointing to hear. In the past it was the youth who promoted change and voting rights. My youngest lives in Atlanta and there was a huge push for young people to get out to vote. My youngest went in person for the tie breaker vote to get two more Dems in Congress. He said every time there a first time voter in line it was announced and applause broke out amongst the people in the voting line. Perhaps in formerly oppressed areas young people had more drive. I can’t speak to why more young people aren’t civic minded. When I was young my contemporaries were dying in Viet Nam so it made us determined to vote for change. I don’t know what it will take to get young people more involved now.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m going with mail in being taking a step backwards. We couldn’t handle the June primary…first miscounts and then it took a month to declare a winner, plus my millennial neighbors, and my daughter, don’t check physical mail boxes…then there’s people who move…too many flaws in the system

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It works great here in Colorado. I doubt the problems are with the concept, but in the execution. We also need to join the modern world and make sure Election Day is a holiday if people have to vote in person.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I think it should be in person, but I’m ok with it being over five days, each day getting assigned an alphabet coding…between environmental concerns of too much paper, the fact that I never get the correct change when using real money (so how are ballots supposed to be counted) the use of ranked choice, and that it could literally take Months to verify any election, I think we must continue to use machines

        Liked by 1 person

  10. A proof of vaccination QR code should be tattooed on the body, by law no exemptions! Goes without saying when you enter a shop museum or buy a ticket to ride a bus you will be scanned for proof of vaccination……………….and you think I’m joking!

    Liked by 2 people

      1. No, no, I like the idea. I wonder if they could integrate some type of remote control? If you say or think anything critical of the state, they could just walk you out in front of a city bus. That’s a win-win. We need to get these people under control.

        Liked by 1 person

      1. Err…..um……not quite the idea I had in mind LA, but good point! I’d describe tattooing proof of vaccination as a prudent measure tailored for extreme times…..you could even include health detail, personal and financial data all to help life run smoother!

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Well a lot of our health info is on apps. Just like my steps are calculated daily on my iPhone, I can program my phone for blood pressure and other medical info. So during a pandemic I don’t think it’s unreasonable to get a number to record your covid vaccine on the health app that comes on your iPhone. Why not? I carry my vaccine card in my wallet. It would be easier to carry certain medical info on an app too.
    Let’s face it, if I can watch movies on prime and my Netflix app and what I’ve watched is recorded then why is it wrong if in an emergency, doctors have my health Info instantly? I have a list of medications, doctors, my emergency numbers on my fridge in case of an emergency. Paramedics tell people to do that. Why not have that info on a health app too? A list of my allergies could save my life.
    Here’s another example. Before my cancer surgery I made a folder for my sons with paperwork of my medical info, my living will, my allergies, doctors etc. That way should I be incapacitated after surgery they had everything they needed to make decisions for me. But if all that could be on an app and it would be even easier.
    Now that I’m in a more vulnerable health situation I see things very differently. I’m going g to fight to live a long time. But should I be unable to talk then I want to be in control of who has my records.
    I have no problem with government knowing who has vaccines. Our children give documentation of their vaccines when they enter school. Or they can’t attend. It protects other kids. It’s very different from my relatives who were deported from Paris and killed in Auschwitz during WWII.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. People need ID’s. I think Voter registrations should include a picture. Not everyone drives but of course people need to verify who they are. Every ten years we are required to get new picture ids for our driver’s license. So people should get a photo ID on their soc security card or on some kind of photo ID. And for goodness sake everyone needs to stop being babies.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I needed to show Id when I went to my doctor last week….her office is in a regular building. I need to show it to get onto my daughters schools. However….one of the greatest issues today is having people show Id when voting. This would set a precedent that it is indeed a thing to require voters to show id. I’m interested in how this plays out

        Like

  12. Yes, it will be interesting to see. In Fl we always needed either an iD or our voters registration card when voting in person and our signature, which was checked with last year’s signature. For mail in ballots this year we had to sign the envelope as a way to verify we were who we said we were.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. This could certainly turn into a political nightmare since there are those who are adamantly opposed to Voter ID but would probably support a vaccine passport. And while we’re at it, maybe we’ll need to show proof of the flu shot, the shingles shot and the pneumonia shot too….just to cover all the bases.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Right? The same people who say asking for ID is marginalizing people are now asking for ID….talk about precedent setting….as tater said, I can’t imagine this doesn’t go to the courts

      Liked by 1 person

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