This week I’ve vented and ranted and got out all my emotions. But now it’s time for the practical:

I’ve reached the age where I now have to take medication and supplements.

Fine.

This happens.

But how do you put on your person what things you are taking, or what conditions you have?

Do you put it in your phone with an ICE (in case of emergency) number?

Do you keep it on a piece of paper in your wallet?

Do you take it behind you license?

Do you tape it behind your phone?

How do you let the world know what medicine or supplements you are taking if you were ever to fall ill and not be able to speak?

Where do you keep the phone number of your primary care physician?

I’m adding this after the initial writing because I realized that I wasn’t clear in why I was asking:

Say you pass out somewhere. EMT comes to your aid but you are unable to communicate. How do they know what they can and can’t give you medicine wise? Or treatment wise? Knowing what medicine you’ve taken could help medics help you

Inquiring minds want to know

79 thoughts on “Anything Can Happen Friday: Practical

  1. Hmm. I’m a generation ahead of you, LA, and I have to admit to never having considered any of these questions, although I take several meds daily! If what you’re taking is of the utmost daily urgency, you could wear an alert bracelet or pendant. Otherwise, as long as your husband and daughter know where your medication is they could bring it to where you’ve been taken or read the label over the phone.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. It’s not so much for taking it as what if I pass out and I need to be treated, how does the ER know what I’m already taking so the medicines don’t counteract one another, or what conditions I have?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Good questions, which I’ve never considered. But now that I think about it, Canadians have their Medicare cards in their wallets (at least most of us carry them their), so the ER could quickly find our doc and next of kin. And, of course, there would be no bill! 😏 So I guess one answer to your question is to keep your info in your wallet!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Even if they had my insurance card, which I carry, I don’t think they’d be able to easily access my info. What if it’s tine sensitive? Because if privacy laws I don’t know if they could look anything up.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Well….I think any and all of the suggestions you mentioned are valid and will work. But I will also add that with the pretty universal “migration” to electronic medical records over the last several years, that most doctors are now required to adhere to, it is much easier for medical personnel to access your medical records and therein your medication list. There are connections now between doctors, pharmacies and hospital systems that never used to exist prior to electronic records.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. But say you’re in the ambulance. Time is not necessarily n your side. What do they do? They treat what they think is wrong. But what if treatment is bad because of what you take or what you have?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My assumption is that they then try to correct it later……when they find out. I would imagine that this is actually the case in a great many squad runs that are of an emergent nature. They do the best they can with whatever information they have at the time. Sometimes, if their action wasn’t quite right for some of the “unknown factors”, the results can be mitigated……other times, maybe not. I would also imagine that the general public is probably not made aware of the 2nd scenario, in most cases. Squad personnel in general are pretty highly trained these days, in comparison to the days many many years ago when they mostly just plopped folks onto a stretcher and rushed them to a hospital, without much else in between. We’ve come a long way…for the good.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. If you live in a city, I think some people will come to your aid. For those in more isolated area, the main concern would be people finding and helping them. I don’t take many meds, only for high cholesterol and my husband does not take many meds either as his cancer treatment is a very expensive shot once a month. Hopefully if you are collapse in your area, some will recognize you and come to your aid as in a matter of crime. You can always carry a phone and info with you to let them know who to contact in case of emergency.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. And if inserted on your phone alongside your ICE and doctor’s number – do you keep a separate record of the unlock code haha :-p
    I seem to recall that, years ago, there were these lockets that people wore that had that sort of info on a long slip of paper.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Emergent care in that setting is meant to stabilize for transport to a higher facility. I would suppose the meds onboard are the least likely to cause reactions with most general prescribed medications. They want IV fluids, a stable BP and decent respiration. After that it’s scoop and run and unless you are rural usually in the hands of the ED pretty quickly, where electronic records are accessed. Also the initial blood draw can provide info as well. Logically though, you have to assume interactions happen in the field at times. Epipens, CPR and ventilation will hopefully keep you going… It would be interesting and extremely useful though to ask this question of first responder’s to get some background.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I figure like this. When the ers cane to my house the first thing they did was ask me about medications and health issues. First thing. So it stands to reason if that’s the first question, if you can’t answer, shouldn’t the info be readily available?

      Liked by 3 people

      1. It should but in most cases it likely won’t be I would assume. If, like you, someone is conscientious and wanting to receive the best help they can, they will explore the question about where to store that info, from an expert responder! How about send an email or use a contact form on police/fire website for your area and ask. Or even city government with a query. Keep going until you get a good answer and then let us all know! 😉

        Liked by 4 people

    2. I know you are a medical person and I have a question. Some people have ‘do not resuscitate’ tattooed upon they’re body ,so would first responders ignore that request/wish and just carry on trying to save your life? Always wondered that one.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. My understanding is that ems will carry out cpr unless they are 100% certain a DNR exists and is available at scene, as in written form signed by physician. Now does “written in tattoo” qualify…legally probably not so I assume they would begin cpr

        Liked by 2 people

  6. I am not taking anything but vitamins currently. I wonder if that will change once I get my physical later this month? You gave me a lot to think about. My husband takes meds. I will research this and ask some of my nurse and doctor friends.

    Liked by 3 people

      1. I’d think so too… but..what protection do they have when the person who passed out says “hey, I only have $25 in my wallet now..I had $550 before I hit the floor!”

        Liked by 1 person

  7. That is a very good question. I have a couple of ideas. As you know my hubby has a long list of health issues so I bought a medic alert pendant and had his most sever conditions engraved on the back of it. As for the list of medications, take a photo of it and put it on your phone, maybe as a screen saver? That’s all I have at the moment. Will come back if I think of anything else. I will check back to read everyone’s comments later. Good luck hon.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. MedicAlert bracelets are a good idea if you have allergies and life-threatening conditions. I believe they also have a phone number with more info on file. We used to give out the application forms in the pharmacy. They may even have an app for phones now too?

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Hmm good questions LA, I don’t carry any medical information on my person, not that I have a reason not to just that I’m lazy! …………..As Jane commented, I have epilepsy, a condition that first responders do really need to know so I should really wear a pendant or bracelet………….I hate bracelets so I guess that means I should wear a pendant around my neck?

    I’d guess if you kept important information in a wallet or purse then that would suffice.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. One of the newer versions of Medic Alert bracelets require you to fill out an extensive list of all your meds, allergies, health issues, etc so that when first responders see the bracelet they can access all that info you provided. I work with Alzheimer’s/dementia folks and caregivers and they have a particular system where both the person with dementia AND their caregiver BOTH get a bracelet with all their info on it PLUS the caregiver’s bracelet also says ….” I’m a caregiver for someone with dementia and they are home alone”. So, regardless of whether you have dementia or are a caregiver, this world solve your need for first responders to have access to your info. Google Medic Alert bracelets.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Hmmmm….seems like there must be an app for that, yet, how does someone that doesn’t know you personally access your phone if you are incapacitated. Wow. I hadn’t thought about this before. More reflection time for me on this one….

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Just saw that iphones have an app Medical ID that allows 1st responders to access phone even if locked. Something along those lines is also available for android! I am so excited about this!!

    Liked by 3 people

  13. We keep our important financial and health insurance cards in our wallets – how hard is it to write your medications on a small piece of cardboard and include with your cards? This is part of taking responsibility for your own health. Easy Peasy. A Or is this something else we expect the Government to do for us ?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. See…that’s what I want to know…where do you write it? I thought about taping it to the back of my license, but was interested in what others did. Was looking for possible solutions

      Liked by 2 people

  14. I take photos of my meds and put them in an album on my phone called information. I also have photos of my my Medicare card and my insurance. Maybe that would work?

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Great question for people of all ages, LA. I think it’s important first to ask our doctors what information is vital for first responders. Others have suggested where to put the info. I focus on keeping my husband fully informed of my medical needs, my doctor’s contact info, and living will choices because he is programmed in my phone and as my emergency contact on all my medical forms. He also has my master password to my password manager so he can get into any medical account to get info if needed. Ultimately, I hope paramedics can stabilize me and give the ER team enough time to call him.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Hmm I’ve decided to put a card inside my phone case……………..I have my doubts a paramedic would look through a purse or wallet and my phone is always with me. Good blog.

    ( 😀 @ wakinguponthewrongsideof50 for questions you’ve always wondered the answer to but never bothered asking!)

    Liked by 2 people

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