Did you know that Amazon sells tiny houses?

I don’t know why I’m surprised. I’m beginning to think you can get everything you want via Amazon…

Just imagine, you can flit off to some plot of land, and in 3-5 weeks you can have a little house delivered…free shipping…

I don’t know why the thought of Amazon selling houses intrigues me so much…but I guess I’m imagining a world where children never move away from their parents. They just move into a tiny house in the backyard…

Would you ever consider the tiny house trend? Do you think it’s a solution to housing problems? Or do you think it creates other problems?

Or are you just shaking your head at what can be purchased online?

111 thoughts on “Hold me Closer Tiny House

  1. I think a tiny house would be amazing as a temporary situation. For example, say I bought a piece of property in Maine and wanted to live on it right away, while I had a permanent home built- I could live in a tiny house, then once my home was built, I could rent out the tiny house as an airbnb! Holy crap, now I want to do that! 🙂 Seems to me that no matter what size house I live in, my animals and children congregate wherever I am anyway. Might as well trim the excess. LOL.

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  2. You know Sears used to sell whole house kits right? I suppose they were considered “cottage size” by today’s standards so it seems Amazon is just following in their footsteps.

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      1. I think it was back in the 40’s maybe. I’ve seen pictures of the finished homes and they were actually very nice, not small at all to me. I rather like the idea.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Some cities around here (your sister is in/near Seattle right?) are incorporating allowances for tiny homes as accessory dwellings. Most of us call them “mother in law units” cause I think that was the original idea. Anyway, we have a pretty big industry out here surrounding various types of tiny houses.

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      3. My sister is in Seattle…I’m going to have to ask her about this trend. I love the idea of everyone downsizing…just practicality purposes…but wondering about this for places where people don’t have housing options…there’s actually a great idea in here somewhere

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Again, many places here, Seattle/Tacoma are using very small versions of these houses for the homeless. Attempts to get them out of tent communities at least…

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Most places using them here are labeling them as transitional shelters: a solid place to sleep, store belongings and be safer than in a tent or tarp under a bridge as shelters just aren’t equipped to house people long term. Portable toilets are placed and some even have a small, rudimentary cooking area but no running water for cleaning, etc. There’s pros and cons of course and like everything the work on this entire topic has taken a backseat to Covid.

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  3. We stayed in a tiny house once by accident. It was an AirBnB. Either it wasn’t described as a tiny house or we somehow missed that.

    We still laugh about it. It was like being in a dollhouse. Never mind that it was none too clean and the homeowners of the main house were onsite and were, shall we say, slightly nuts. They appeared to have had some issues with hoarding.

    Quite the adventure, and an anniversary we will always remember. But it cured us of any notion that we would ever like to occupy a tiny house.

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  4. We stayed in a tiny house once by accident. It was an AirBnB, and either it was not described as a tiny house or we somehow missed that entirely.

    We still laugh about it. It was like being in a dollhouse. Never mind that it was none too clean and the homeowners of the main house, who were onsite, were slightly nuts with what seemed to be a propensity for hoarding.

    The tiny house had a tiny compost toilet. In the bathroom there was a detailed set of rules about using this toilet which, by the end of our short stay, I was calling the “combustible toilet.” I would not use it, and went to Starbucks instead.

    It was an adventure, and an anniversary we will never forget. It definitely cured us of any notion that we would ever like to stay in a tiny house. Can you say claustrophobia?

    Liked by 3 people

  5. You can still find the homes that Sears sold, I think they are listed as historic buildings. I do believe we all need to think smaller, but a tiny house is just a bit small for me. It would be harder for older people as they should be on one floor. Most Tiny houses I have seen have lofts, not doable if you need to get up in the middle of the night! I built my house with an attached apartment for my mother, my kids got a lot from living next door to her. My son and his fiance are now renting it. I will say that I would prefer a smaller home than what I have as we don’t need 4 bedrooms.
    I think Tiny house have uses but for extended times it is not feasible.

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  6. Tiny houses can take a number of different forms. I probably wouldn’t go for the very smallest. But I do think I could end up in one someday. I would have a couple other buildings on the property, though.

    What I wouldn’t do is buy one from Amazon. I am a believer in shopping local.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Ok…I’m putting my analyst hat on here…conservatively…I think 6 out if 10 retail establishments that were in business on 1/1/20 will be permanently closed as of 1/1/21.

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  7. Some of the churches in our region have created tiny house communities (usually 8-20 houses) to provide safe housing for the homeless. Some are also affiliated with local colleges to provide housing for students who would otherwise be homeless. They have strict rules about drinking and drugs. Generally, they are intended for shorter periods of time, while people find a more permanent solution, but some stay quite a while. I’ve seen the houses up close and been in them, and was impressed by the design, use of space, insulation, and also the camaraderie of the people in the community. I think we’ll see more of them as cities look for solutions to the growing homelessness situation. I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised that one can buy a tiny home on Amazon, but I was….

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  8. Our son lived in an unofficial tiny house for a while. It was before the tiny house craze. Really, it was just a renovated shed. He kept it as neat as a pin. John’s sister and her husband live in a Sears Roebuck house on Long Island. It’s in an older section of Stony Brook.

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  9. A little bit of all your questions! I can’t believe that amazon sales this! I freaking love it. I have told my husband for years that I would love to buy land near water and enjoy life without all the extra expense. But him being the guy he is, told me that’s not safe! Water will up root us and we will die.

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  10. thank you for teaching me something today, I had no idea Amazon sold tiny homes……I would love to live in much smaller place but don’t think I could handle anything under 500 sq.ft. We know a family that purchase a bunch of land and are building tiny homes for all of their kids and close relatives……….I think this is wonderful.

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  11. I know this sounds spoiled, but I cannot imagine living in a tiny house. I have a friend who lives in an RV and I love the way she makes it work, but I couldn’t/don’t want to do it. I have moved twice this year; once in May and then again in August. Don’t ask. I love my new townhouse and can’t wanting imagine anything smaller.

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  12. I would love to build you a tiny house! and I am confident I can beat Amazon’s price. Just need to get yourself a little piece of ground and give me a little notice. 🙂 PS I edited your comment from this morning. It’s all good. Did give me a good laugh however 🙂 Take care! DM

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I know that “kits” for building houses used to be a thing, so I guess I’m not surprised that Amazon sells tiny houses. Personally, I would not want to live in anything that’s small enough some drunk can tip it over on his way home from the bar. I can see the point of downsizing, but not to that extreme. I think it would be so hard to live in one (how do you manage to store your necessities, what happens if someone comes to visit? etc.) that it wouldn’t be worth the trouble.

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