I have finally found two things that everyone appears to agree on:

  1. Everyone is on hold until there’s a vaccines
  2. NO ONE PLANS ON GETTING THE VACCINE

Doesn’t matter gender, sexual orientation, nationality, religion, socioeconomic status, political affiliation or which Kardashian is your favorite. In my very unscientific survey, absolutely no one wants to be inoculated.

The reasons vary:

  1. They don’t trust the government
  2. They don’t trust Bill Gates
  3. Vaccine was too rushed
  4. They are tired of being told what to do
  5. Due to other issues, they have problems with vaccines and  the preservatives in them

I understand and empathize with every one of those reasons. I get it.

But here’s my question:

If no one plans on taking the vaccine, why do people keep saying- “Oh, life will be great when the vaccine comes out…things will go back to a sort of “new normal”.

Do people expect everyone else to get inoculated, but not themselves?

I didn’t intend to write about this today. I expected to give you a rather interesting essay about my recent hunt for sneaker laces including a picture of my new kicks (coming soon to a blog near you late October 2020), but day seizing my new attitude, I went with the topic that I’ve been discussing with friends and family for the past few days.

What are you going to do LA? you ask. (I heard you saying it- I do have a Mother’s spidey sense when I think someone is talking about me- and that my very wise friend G asked me the exact question yesterday)

I assume that students will be required to be vaccinated in order to go to school. If that is the case, then my daughter will be mandated. If my daughter gets the vaccine I will without hesitation, get the vaccine when I am able to.

There is no other option for me.

But my thought process is a little bit pessimistic right now.

If no one plans on actually getting the vaccine, what are we doing right now? If no one gets the vaccination, we will be in exactly the same place we are for the foreseeable future.

Which brings us to:

Will we all be required to get vaccinated?

Will we need to brandish ID cards to show we’ve been vaccinated before we will be allowed to do anything?

Here are my questions for you:

  1. Have you put everything on hold because you are waiting for the vaccine?
  2. Do you plan on getting the vaccine?

I get that this is a big deal, so you don’t have to comment. But please think about what I’ve written today. Discuss your issues and concerns with your family/friends.

Discuss/Think

131 thoughts on “To Vaccinate or Not to Vaccinate: It’s Totally the Question

  1. I’ve been concerned for a while about the growing trend of “shut everything down until the vaccine” thinking coupled with either “I won’t get the vaccine” or “we might not have a vaccine for years” if we won’t have a vaccine or people won’t get the vaccine we need to figure out how to reopen and live with the disease

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Exactly what I’m thinking. If no one plans on getting vaccinated, we’ve wasted everything this past year. I was actually shocked that no one wants to get the vaccine. I have friends who said they will homeschool their kids…..so….yeah…

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I have put my plans on hold and I am waiting for the vaccine. Having said that, I don’t want to be the first in line to get it. Since things do seem a little hurried up (maybe it isn’t and the researchers know what they are doing. Maybe it is because we still believe good things come to those who wait longer 😛) so, if there are any side effects, I don’t want to get it. So others can get the shots first and we will wait for a month or two before deciding to get vaccinated. 😉
    Btw, vaccine doesn’t 100% prevent any disease. I remember getting a typhoid vaccine when I was a kid, but I still got typhoid. So, there will be exceptions.🤷‍♀️

    Liked by 3 people

      1. I think most of us aren’t worried about the hurried up part. We aren’t sure if the vaccine is really going to be effective. There are some vaccines which need booster doses too. (I think the Oxford one requires a booster dose).

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I would most likely get the vaccine, especially since I am a nurse. Also have some chronic illness issues that could make getting COVID-19 worse for me.
    Had an online conversation with a teacher. She says–it will never be safe to go back to the classroom–also says–I don’t trust vaccines. So who knows what the answer is.
    So many conspiracy theorists in regards to the vaccine–they would rather believe some guy on twitter, than do some actual research.

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  4. Main problem: viruses mutate. Each year they create a new flu shot that is based on what they predict the strain will be. It does not always address the exact strain when flu season happens (bec the vaccine has to be made ahead of flu season, and distributed, which all takes time). It’s a big guessing game…

    A covid vaccine may work, or not, for some people but only if the strain doesn’t mutate (it already has, we had SARS a few years ago which was the first coronavirus – the current on is the second one).

    I’m unconvinced that a rushed covid vaccine will be the savior of all that is wrong, and focus on other things like strong immunity instead (for now).

    Other problems: trust in gov’t and big pharma (not), and side effects. It’s a concern.

    I tend to focus on health practitioners that are both traditional method and naturopathic, and combine the information by both for optimal health. I will wait to see what both my doctor and my naturopath say before I decide.

    Children – I have no idea how to pursue this. I will wait and see and gather information. Good news is they are only getting older…and have options. If they were younger, I’d have to navigate differently.

    Final decision: I am not against it but will not commit (yet, maybe ever), or rush a decision.

    Frankly, I think we can adapt by being innovative, and think outside the box. Not sure though how this will affect the community we live in since we all know there are plenty of covidiots around and it’s them, the select few, that cause the spikes by immature/irresponsible behaviour, negating the collective effects of those of us who have followed common sense and protocol.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. All excellent points. There’s much to consider, which I don’t know if anyone is actually considering. I’ve never gotten a flu shot, neither has my daughter. I’m fine with other vaccinations, but since flu vaccines are projected, there’s absolutely no guarantee. This is the same mutating stuff. But if my kid gets it, so do i

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Good job with this post. Starts out funny, ends with some serious considerations. I wasn’t aware that everyone is saying they won’t get the vaccine. Maybe so. But when push comes to shove, I think we’ll step up. Like the man said, maybe we won’t be first in line, but we’ll get there eventually. I also think the drug companies will publish some compelling information that will help people feel more comfortable about the vaccine. And we’ll have a choice as to which one to take. Maybe.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I had a funny encounter this morning walking for exercise. I met a woman (Arabic) with her mouth covered, head covered walking. Our neighborhood has many Arabic speakers. She stepped aside and asked me why I was not wearing something to cover my mouth? I said, “We are 12 feet apart and then I said, “I didn’t anticipate meeting you” kind of snidely. Sometimes this is getting old.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Regarding coronavirus—SARS was not the “first” one. There are many coronaviruses–COVID-19 causes more illness and death than other strains.
    I have received the flu shot yearly for 20+ years–just because there is the potential for mutation does not mean there isn’t value in still receiving it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes I think this is true what you say. Forgive me for saying it was the first one – I live in Toronto and the first time I saw masks around the city was during our SARS outbreak. I made the incorrect conclusion based on seeing the early signs of that coronavirus affect our community in a similar fashion. Although Toronto was one of the harder hit places at the time, it went away leading to much confusion when COVID-19 hit here. We looked at the SARS experience and thought the outcome wasn’t as dire, why is COVID a global pandemic? Turns out this time it was much more widespread. (I have family in Italy, one of the hardest hit countries).

      Doesn’t really convince me about the flu shot though. Only my dad had taken it out of our immediate family and he got dire flus each time, each season. None of the rest of us did, without the shot. That confuses me.

      I’ll wait to see what our doctor advises.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You can’t get the flu from the flu shot. You may have a mild reaction to the shot consisting of fever and muscle aches. Or you could become infected with the flu before the flu shot fully takes effect.

        Liked by 4 people

  8. I’ll probably get the vaccine when I’ve decided it’s reasonably safe. In the past, I didn’t get flu shots, but now I do. I don’t like the idea of side-effects or the fact that you can’t totally count on it working, but it seems like a better option than just staying in my apartment for the rest of my life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m trying to get a sense of what people are thinking….and if people have talked about this with others….I think people would be surprised at what others might say

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I haven’t put everything on hold.
    I plan to get the vaccine when it’s available.

    I’m not sure where you got your “no one wants to get the vaccine” information, but of course it’s easy to say what you will/won’t do in the future but acting on it is a different story

    Liked by 2 people

    1. No one, not one person, in my personal life, which includes family friends, acquaintances and work colleagues of my husband has expressed any desire to get vaccinated….to the point of one guy said he will homeschool his kids first. As stated, this is an extremely unscientific poll. But, needed to throw this out there.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Nope. I purposely didn’t include the wsj thing in the blog because that’s not what my post is about, nor do I want it to go there. I told you because it was the catalyst that made me start asking people their opinion

        Liked by 1 person

  10. I’ve never gotten a flu shot, even when I was working in a doctor’s office for 20+ years. I also have never gotten the flu. Maybe if I had gotten sick, I would get the shot? I had the kids vaccinated when they were little but they are all adults now and truthfully, just because they may get the vaccine I still probably wouldn’t for a lot of the reasons you mention. My husband gets the flu shot every year so he might. I definitely would want to see what the reactions are first. I don’t even like changing the operating system on my Mac until all the bugs get worked out!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Even Anti-Vaxxers will vacillate on this question. At some point, later not sooner, I probably take the cure(?) by the buy-in .. flu season in the southern hemisphere has been remarkably tame due to covid precautions

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I am not one to get a flu shot normally, but my husband and son do as they are around more people than I, but when it is determined that the vaccine has been studied and is safe I will get one. That being said, now that I am getting older I should be getting a flu vaccine now also.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. No, I will not get the vaccine–for all of the reasons you listed plus the mutation issue. As to next year, a large part of the population should have herd immunity for this year’s strain. If the virus mutates again, the vaccine will not protect against that anyway. Everyone keeps referring to the “science” and I think that is valuable BUT whose science are we going to look at? So much is politically motivated or money driven. You can make data say whatever you want it to say. It comes down to whom do you actually trust?
    On a different issue, and I am not trying to be snarky, this is a real question: you are adamant that if your daughter has to get the vaccine, you will too. Why is that?
    Thanks for all the important issues you put on the table for discussion. It is interesting to hear others’ ideas whether you agree with them or not. Actual CIVIL discourse!!!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. If there are side effects to it I will not subject my daughter to it without also doing it myself. I can’t have her doing something I won’t do. And I mean things like this…she cliff dives and does roller coasters out of joy where I get a nosebleed on a step ladder…and yo7 know what I think about herd immunity, so yeah…and thank you for taking part! We need to learn to discuss things…

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I will be getting the vaccine, and I also get the annual flu shot. As a retired health care professional it was required by my hospital, as you are protecting the patients from YOU. Having had the flu twice in my life, even if it isn’t 100% protection or they get the strain mixture wrong that year, (they put 3 strains in it but have to decide which ones will be circulating 6 months ahead of winter, based on southern hemisphere stats and yes some years it’s a mismatch), you will have some protection and hopefully a milder case. I get the personal choice/you can’t force me/these are my rights etc, but the whole anti-vaxer thing just boggles my mind. I do a lot of genealogy and people, including children, just died back then from preventable diseases, how our ancestors would have loved to have had vaccines. Even if we don’t have the traditional amount of long term data for a Covid vaccine, the benefits outweigh the risks, in my opinion, and I trust the highly skilled, highly ethical scientists to get it right. Certain people in power seem to have sown the seeds of distrust of science in your country to a level that I don’t see here in Canada.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. LA I’m not saying every Canadian will be lining up for the vaccine, just that there tends to be less skepticism of vaccines/science in general here and less preoccupation with personal rights. I remember the long lineups for the H1N1 vaccine in 2009, which was supplied free by the government, and that only caused 55 deaths vs 10,000 so far. Unfortunately I got H1N1 flu the week before they started vaccinating and then had two weeks of misery. I suppose it depends on your personal experience and potential for exposure. The US will get the vaccine long before we do, as Trudeau our PM blew it when he signed a deal with a Chinese company early days, which didn’t work out because of the fractured relations with China over that Meng Jo US extradition case, and the Chinese retaliated by not sending us samples to do clinical trial. So recently he signed on with the Oxford/Pfizer/Astra group, but we are now waaaaay down the list of countries. Not sure if that’s good or bad, as other countries will be the guinea pigs. It’s a good discussion.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Americans are totally skeptical…look at how many don’t believe there was a moon landing…and I am the biggest questioner…I’m the ultimate what if person….so it will be interesting to see it play out

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Another factor is the cost of the vaccine to the person getting it…….will it be free for people who can’t afford it, for ex. the poor and homeless? It will be interesting to see what the drug companies price it at. I did not know people questioned the moon landing but then I watched it in the late 1960’s when I was a kid and I’m pretty sure it wasn’t fake news!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. My daughter said there’s scads of info about people not thinking it was real!! And to the next point….I’m betting it’s covered by insurance and free for those who can’t afford it. I know those who can’t afford tests get them for free

        Liked by 1 person

  15. I always get a flu shot. Sure, occasionally they miss the target on which viruses will be prevalent, but even then it doesn’t hurt you, it just isn’t necessarily effective for that flu season. In my province seniors are able to get their flu shot for free at any pharmacy when the seasonal vaccine becomes available.

    I am so old that my elementary school was part of the final trials for the Salk vaccine against polio. It was considered (and was) the miracle that saved the world from polio. Those of us who turned out to have been given the placebo during the trials lined up to get the real thing once the trials were considered a success. When we had our kids we were religious in making sure that our children got their shots and boosters exactly on schedule. I’m not sure why this all changed, but if the majority of the population isn’t protected then everyone is at risk. Accepting to be given a covid vaccine that is rushed is another question. We’ll wait and see whether scientists really agree that a vaccine is ready soon. So far it’s just been hopeful politicians picking up on encouraging statements. The scientists had always said it would need at least 18 months. And this virus is good at mutating. But this old-timer has a hard time understanding how people can say they won’t be vaccinated in advance of knowing what and when. Good questions, LA.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Jane, I remember getting the polio vaccine in grade 2 – the oral vaccine on a sugar cube, a thing strange enough to stick out in my memory. But I knew kids a few years older who got polio, one lost a whole year of school, and my old boss walked with crutches because of a bad case. My mother remembers that summer as one when you did NOT take your kids to the beach or anywhere. A fellow oldie….Joni

      Liked by 3 people

  16. I’m not sure about getting the vaccine. I haven’t really thought about it. I think i would let other people go first and see how it works oit and then I will decide.

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  17. I have gotten a flu shot every year since 1998, when I contracted a case of the flu severe enough to frighten me. My son had just turned 2, and I was so ill that he could have been sitting in the corner playing with razor blades, eating Drain-O or running outside into traffic, and I would have been unable to get up and stop him.

    I find it perplexing that in this pandemic, many people simultaneously disdain science yet seem to be waiting for it to rescue them in the form of a vaccine. I’ll make my decision about the COVID-19 vaccine after I analyze all the studies carefully. If anything in the data makes me hesitate about getting it right away, I’ll continue to isolate, which I’ve done since March 10. If the data look solid, and there have been no deaths or life-threatening side effects from the vaccine, I will get it.

    It’s important to remember conspiracy-based fear mongering about the vaccine is likely from Russian sources that are, regrettably, doing a bang-up job of keeping us alarmed and divided.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. I get the flu vaccine every year. I keep wishing for a cold vaccine because I get so sick during the winter. I can’t fathom how sick I would get without the flu vaccine. I’ll get the covid vaccine when it becomes available. Even if it requires yearly boosters. It can’t hurt and it most likely will help. I need to live a long time to take care of my special needs son as long as possible.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Right now I’m reserving judgement. I do feel like this is being crammed through, for good reasons, but I want to feel secure that it was still thoroughly vetted before being dropped on the general public. We have these testing and safety protocols for a reason. If I feel confident that it was, then hell yeah! I’m going to jump in that line. If not, I’m going to continue to wait and see, if I can (though I’m also perfectly content to remain stuck at home while I do that). I honestly don’t know how I’d feel if it was mandated for my kids and I didn’t feel like it had gotten that thorough vetting.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Let’s play with the bell curve….say 25% are totally not getting vaccine, 25% are socially distancing lining up for it, and 50% wait and see. What’s the point that makes them turn one way or another, and how long does it take? I know there are no actual answers for this, but at what point to you make a decision.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. For me it is going to be feeling as if the vaccine is solid and safe. If it doesn’t follow proper protocols to ensure full testing and safety before release to the general public, then that will be an issue. If it does, then I think that those numbers will be very different. Too many health agencies/experts are expressing concern about the safety of the current process at the moment to make the general public feel confident that the vaccine is worth the risk. If the information coming from those experts changes, then I think the attitude about getting the vaccine will also change. That is why I’m at wait and see. I think it is still way too early to be able to confidently say one way or another because the information about the vaccine isn’t all the consistent yet.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. What if different experts have different opinions? What if your kids can’t go to school without it? I don’t mean you specifically, this is more about what will make those people in the middle go one way or another

        Liked by 1 person

  20. I’m living a fairly normal life, since I’m retired and live away from town. I wear a mask among people because our state mandates it and because it is supposed to protect others. As to the vaccine, I will consult my doctor. I trust her to rely on medical research and not political opinion in making her recommendation for me.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. These are opinions, not facts. My first opinion is that too many people who talk about vaccines confuse facts and opinions.

    My short answer based on my years of vaccinating millions of chickens – vaccines work.

    They may not be perfect and there may be the odd adverse reaction but they are, on balance, a good thing.

    I started having flu vaccine when I was in my late 50s. It may not work every year (though it has never let me down) but that’s not a reason for not having it.Its main strength is that you build up better immunity with every dose so the more you have the better your immunity becomes.

    I will have the pneumonia vaccine when I am 65. Or before, if offered.

    I will also have the Covid vaccine when it is available – the chances of something going wrong are small. It may not work – well so what? I’ll never know unless I try. The virus may mutate – yes, they do that, but see my previous answers. You may need a booster – yes, you might. Is that a problem? You need a booster for lots of vaccinations.

    If you want to be anti-vaccine that’s your privilege. But I’m going to take all I can get.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m going to give you my thought process for this blog. Two weeks ago I read an article in the Wall st journal that stated some people had an issue with the vaccine. I was surprised by this because I’d assumed that people would be lining up for it. Then I started asking people, friends, neighbors, acquaintances etc. people were afraid of the vaccine. I’m not saying this is right or wrong (I’m fully vaccinated as we speak as is my daughter and cat except for flu) I’m just stating that if people choose not to get vaccinated, or wait to see how it works, we could be like this for the long haul. As of now I’m preparing to get vaccinated when I’m allowed…but others? Not so sure

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You have to keep measles vaccination rates up around 95% for it to work in a nation, so I suppose it’s much the same for herd immunity and Covid. If people won’t have the vaccination you could be right about the long haul.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. That’s my worry, which is why I’m imploring people to think about this. Someone said when the vaccine comes out she’ll study it and then decide. So I gave her a bell curving theory….25% get it as soon as it comes out. 25% don’t want it at all. 50% are wait and see. Well, what makes you go one side or the other? Which experts, what numbers, what amount of research push you to make a decision. This comes back to choices and options….if people feel there’s a choice whether or not to take it, what goes into that decision? As soon as people get involved, everything’s up in the air…

        Liked by 1 person

      1. idk I am sick of it already, potentially facing unemployment sooner than expected. Kinda hoping I can return to the department I left 3 yrs ago to buy some time. 2020 has been the worst.

        Liked by 1 person

  22. I’m 65 and hubby is almost 65. We are still sheltering in place here in southern California where there are still plenty of cases of the virus. Hubby is working from home now, his company will not go back to “in real life” until at least January, maybe later. I used to love to volunteer at a local thrift store that benefits a charity, but gave that up in March. I won’t go back until there is a vaccine, and I have been vaccinated. I feel working in a store with the public would be a great way to get the virus. I’d love to be one of the first in line for the vaccine, but I think it will (rightly) go first to health care workers, first responders, etc. Then there is talk that since minority groups have more cases, they should be next in line. So … my “place in line” will surely be down the list a bit. I cannot fly to the east coast to visit my family and granddaughter at the moment, and probably won’t do that until there is a vaccine. There is a chance that none of the vaccines currently in the final phase of testing will do well enough to be distributed nationally also. I pretty much won’t believe there is actually a vaccine until I see it. I’ve already gotten my flu shot, and I just got my second pneumonia shot as well. I will be willing to take a chance that the vaccine does not produce bad side effects. I contemplated signing up for a trial as well, but one only has a 50% chance of getting the actual vaccine in the trials. That’s too much work for me for only a 50% chance. I realize the vaccine will most likely not provide complete immunity, just like the flu shot. However I’m hoping it will make it so that once does not get AS sick from Covid if one gets it, just like is usually true with the flu vaccine.

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  23. My husband and I will both vaccinate. We religiously get the flu vaccination and have had no problems. If not many vaccinate though, I will probably still wear a mask or face covering in crowds until it is decided how long immunity lasts.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, a lot believe in wait and see. That’s why human clinical trials are done before the vaccine is FDA approved. I am sure we will get ours as soon as it’s available after approval, that being said, I would not want to be in a clinical trial so hats off to those who do!!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yup. Well I’m sure my husband will have to get one if he wants to continue with his job so I’ll get one when he does. I think I’m so used to having to have so many shots over the years when I was in healthcare I’m kind of like eh…what’s another one!!

        Liked by 1 person

  24. I will unequivocally get the vaccine. I’ll have to for work, but also I live in a multi- generational home with my mother who is compromised. So it’s a must. Hell, I would even be one of the guinea pigs for the vaccine. Enough said. We all need to jump in the deep-end for the good of all.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. No. I’ve been a closet anti-vaxxer for years. This occasion has given me boldness. Funny story, and don’t tell the police, I forged my shot record when I was in high school and was supposed to get the MMR booster. Not because I knew anything about it, but because I had a huge fear of needles. My mom couldn’t make me do it, so she gave up. But back to the topic, I don’t plan to get any shots. I don’t get flu shots. None of my kids are in college so there’s that. My husband is self-employed, so that’s not an issue. We will see how it goes. Btw, did you know that a subset of people are having pro-longed, life-changing illness from covid that looks very much like Lyme disease and Chronic Fatigue? That would really suck. But I don’t think we know why some people get that reaction and others don’t, nor whether a shot will help or possibly induce that reaction in some people. The most important thing is to protect your immune system! If you have food allergies, constipation, rashes, etc, you must fix your gut health! Your gut is a huge part of your immune system. Good luck everyone, and may the odds be ever in your favor.

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  26. I haven’t put anything on hold that hasn’t forced my hand to do it. And under no circumstances will I be vaccinated. I don’t get the flu vaccination and I’ve never had the flu. Haven’t gotten COVID and plan to keep it that way.

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  27. With one kiddo in college and another going in two years, I have to consider their health. So if they get it then I will too. I don’t want to and I will do a lot of research. I think it will be a challenge to get my husband on board. This is a tough one!

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  28. Touching on a previous comment, rubella is dangerous for pregnant women. Mumps can cause male sterility.
    Eating right is certainly important—but disease has been around before there was ever junk food, artificial colors etc.
    I can understand not wanting to get the vaccine right away. I am not sure if I understand people that say they will NEVER get the vaccine. What if you live with someone in a high risk group, like an elderly relative. Or what if your doctor says you are in a high risk group and likely to suffer the most severe consequences from COVID?
    When I was in nursing school I worked in a nursing home and took care of someone whose legs had almost no strength due to residual effects of polio. That and hearing about moms of earlier generations losing children from diseases that are now vaccine preventable has always stayed with me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was surprised at how many people are at “no”. But then it goes to my question: if only 25% get it up front, with 50% in the wait and see category, where does that leave us?

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  29. I would totally get the vaccine, but when it is first produced, I think medical responders and essential workers should have dibs. As a stay-at-home freelancer, the need for me to get it is not as major as, let’s say, my mom’s, who is a teacher and has to go work at a school. However, after the initial wave of essential people receive it, I will gladly line up to get my vaccine.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Like you, I’m baffled by the number of people who say they think we should stay totally locked down (not that we ever were totally locked down, thank God) until there’s a vaccine, but they also say they wont’ get the vaccine. So live inside for the rest of our lives? No thank you. I’ll try the vaccine. Honestly, I’m 62. If there are side effects down the road, I’d rather I had them than my kids, who are in their early 30s.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. People’s reactions are baffling. I know people who do somewhat risky things but say they won’t go to a concert ever again. One person said those who don’t wear masks are selfish, yet they said they’re not getting vaccinated….

      Liked by 1 person

  31. I thought I wrote some long answer … but must have failed to hit “send”… either that or I replied on someone else’s post 🙂 I’ll definitely get the vaccine, as will hubby. We are still sheltering in place here in CA with hubby working from home. I figure it lots of people don’t want it, I’ll have a better chance of being able to get it.

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  32. We will get the vaccine. It will still take some time before I will feel 100% confident doing certain things but I can’t live like chicken little for the rest of my life. I hope everyone gets the vaccine so I can feel like we’re on equal ground. Kind of like the situation with kids and chicken pox. Doesn’t do any good if we aren’t all doing it.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. I can’t say I’ve put anything on hold because we have no idea when a safe vaccine will be ready. I’m finding workarounds to get what I need accomplished. I’m actually enjoying this more slowed down lifestyle while saving money on gas and car maintenance. I’m in no rush for things to get back to “normal” if they ever do.
    I don’t plan on being first in line to get vaccinated but I do plan to get it. I’ll most likely wait several months once available.

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