There are people who think violence is the best way to end racism

Ok

Let’s think that train of thought for a moment

Bullying in school

So the best way to stop bullying In schools is to bring attention to the matter with violence

Like, you know, a school shooting

Is that what those of you who think violence is the answer….is that how the logic works?

Cause honestly, I’m not smart enough to figure out the whole violence as a solution thing. I need more than one example.

86 thoughts on “Thought for the day

  1. Having been bullied, I came to learn the value of vengeance when I got older and learned to box . . and defend myself. I thought I might “get even” and in a rather forgettable example, I did just that with one of my bullies. The problem was, I never did feel the value of that exchange. It was like digging one hole inside the other.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Defending yourself against an attack is one thing. Thinking that a big violent statement is a solution or path is another. I saw a monument dedicated to black WWII soldiers defaced. Really? What does that do? I just saw a video of a cell phone store being looted? How does that work? I told you…not smart enough to u derstand this

      Liked by 3 people

  2. For sure violence is not the most ideal way to solve anything. Presently it’s the only way people’s cries will be heard, the only avenue of voicing their pain and frustrations which have gone unaddressed, ignored even, for years, decades, heck even centuries, and its about time they put their foot down and demand their rights as human beings. If people would SEE the oppression that spans generations and admit its existence and work towards ending the injustices then maybe, just maybe the violence wouldn’t erupt in that manner. I repeat violence is not the most ideal way to go about it but for how long are we going to sweep these issues under the carpet? Unless you lose your child? I’m glad the topic is finally getting the attention it deserves and people are not here to play this round, people are FED UP.
    My two cents. We are allowed to voice our opinion, innit?
    Also if you have never been in these oppressed people’s shoes, your children have never been victims, then you probably have no idea where and how it hurts so it’s most advisable to keep mum.

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    1. You are totally allowed to have your opinion. If you think this will end racism, then go for it.
      What to you feel about the death of David Dorn or Dave Underwood?
      Also, please dont ask anyone to remain mum.
      If people are allowed to think violence us good, I’m allowed to say I dont think it is.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. But is not some of this about our ancestor’s wrath and misfortune? What if our relatives were decimated years ago in the Holocaust and what if we were never born…we have moved on because we must. Some of us are more forgiving but we must keep alert and yet we cry not the loudest.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. The sooner the oppressors own up to their oppressive ways the better for everyone. If the ROOT CAUSE is addressed the effects of it (violence) will also be sorted. Otherwise the next time it happens (which is possibly any second now – one main reason we are living in constant fear not knowing who’s next) then chances are violent riots will erupt AGAIN and we will be back to square one. See? Before we criticize the oppressed for blowing things out of proportions let us understand the WHY and focus on that instead of criticizing them for snapping out of long suppressed emotions.

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    1. I’m all about peaceful protests. I am not about violence. Ever. Someone just told me in a comment that I should keep mum about things because I’ve never been oppressed….

      Liked by 1 person

      1. How do they know you have never been oppressed? We all have our own story. No one deserves to be judged based on skin colour. I am white but that does not mean I have not seen injustice. Not at the same level as other races have but at other levels that were devastating to me. Other forms of oppression happen with gender, ageism, religion, sexism and more. If we are truly want a societal change and an end to oppression it has to happen at all levels. Equality is ending all oppression and stopping judgement.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Exactly! No, I am not black. I have never faced the oppression that they have. But that doesn’t mean burning down cities will end injustice.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. First statement: do we really know who the people are that are turning to violence? Are they protesters who seek justice by extreme means, or are they “anarchists”- that colloquial term tossed around now to describe anyone bent on chaos and destruction.

    Personally: while I don’t believe violence is the answer I am also trying to use what I see to understand frustrations centered around systemic racism. My own white privilege has allowed me to stay distant from racist oppression, yet I can understand, to a very small extent what being marginalized feels like as a woman in a patriarchal society. Do I/would I have the capability to use violence to direct my message forward? I cannot answer that, because I have not felt the same level of hatred directed at me, nor the levels of pain that any Black person has come to live with every day.

    I can acknowledge that I will likely never understand fully because I will likely never face oppression. I can listen and work along with those who are using their voices to create change however, rather than anyone using fists or rocks to incite violence.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I was told in another comment to keep mum about things I don’t know of. Isn’t oppression being quiet about things that we think are intrinsically wrong? I don’t think violence is ever going to solve anything.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I have always thought of oppression in terms of control, a force that unjustly sets out to rule over another. It could be a government or a majority group of people controlling a smaller group.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Telling someone to be silent is oppression at its purest form. If I see something I think is wrong, I have the freedom (I think) to voice my opinion. No one should ever be told to keep mum. Respect is two ways. I say something you have the right to disagree. You don’t have the right to tell me to not speak of it. And when I say you, it’s not you, it’s universal you

        Liked by 5 people

      3. No one should ever be told not to speak and respect for any voice has to be a part of this process. Everyone has a right to their opinion, to ask questions, to understand- so yes that is a form of control or oppression if you are being told to keep silent.

        I understand that you were voicing concerns regarding something that probably many people feel right now, the violence in all this. Perhaps it is telling that someone reacted with strong words-maybe they feel oppressed themselves? Telling you not to speak shows how easy it is to stop listening, and simply react to what you read or see or hear.

        Your first sentence in this reply says a lot: “Telling someone to be silent is oppression at its purest form.” Some may look upon violence as the only way to give voice to Black oppression. Perhaps, without really trying to understand what you were saying, that person felt that you were also telling those inciting violence to be silent… we all have to read each word and listen to each voice so carefully and not simply react. While I cannot really know why that comment came to you, I can and do understand what it is like to simply react without really fully taking the time to hear the other person.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I fully appreciate your thoughts on this. I’m at a loss because I don’t know how we end the hatred in our world for people who are different, believe differently than ourselves. But it has to start with respect. We need to respect one another as we are. Until we learn that, we are lost. Someone posted that a local monument dedicated to black lives lost during WWII was vandalized? Why that monument? How is that making things better?

        Liked by 2 people

      5. Of course, it’s not making things better in any way and you are only asking the questions out loud that we all are wondering so I’m sorry that you are taking the brunt for so many.
        Our society is entrenched in pointing out and marginalizing difference and diversity. Change is not going to happen in my lifetime and is this current activity enough of a start to propel ongoing change… I don’t know. I hate to say I doubt it, but I do.
        I remember choosing Sociology as a major in part because I wanted to understand our history and I also wanted to learn how to embrace and respect diversity personally and in my professional life. Sadly, there is no way to make someone respect another person, not with our deep and disrespectful social history.
        I remember that saying “Be The Change” and now I feel tears and loss of hope. Too many will never change, never accept, never respect.

        Liked by 1 person

      6. I live in a city because I wanted my daughter to know, accept and understand people from all over, regardless of race, religion, gender orientation or whatever. My feeling is the only way I could raise a tolerant child was to expose her to people so she could see that despite some differences, all people have the capacity to be good, thoughtful, intelligent citizens of the world. My daughter has attended, and I have volunteered at schools that were title 1, and we were in the minority as far as race was concerned. I will never understand what it’s like to walk in their shoes. But I’ve tried to walk alongside them, taught my daughter to walk along side them. Because until we learn to walk together we can’t run…

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m with you 100%. Unfortunately, the current leader of the US encourages, in fact emulates, bullying, revenge, and violence. The peaceful protesters must win out over those prone to violence, by numbers of people and by being consistently peaceful. It looks like that is starting to happen, at least in some cities. 😥

    Liked by 2 people

    1. As large cities burn, as cops are injured and killed….and many of the cities with the worst protests are lead by democrats…it doesn’t matter. Violence is bad.
      Peaceful protests are fine. They are the right way to do things. I haven’t seen much of that here. The only way to stop the riots is to embrace peace

      Liked by 2 people

  5. I can believe there is oppression in many parts of the world but I believe that many of us are struggling now and not just minorities or those considered minorities. I don’t believe in throwing jobs at people just because they are minorities either. I believe the best qualified person should win the job. This statement is in relation to a posting I read recently and wondered if the writer didn’t know that offering the job to an African American just based on their race was a form of being racist. We are all in this together so hopefully we can find an answer or at least reach out without prejudiced opinions and open minds to help one another regardless of the race.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. And here I am sitting in northern Alberta, Canada and scared silly for people I know there. I am scared for the the people who will be hurt by the erupting violence, the trauma many will go through. And I am frightened, and yes angry and sad as well. It all feels so heavy and I feel so helpless. So I pray. Again and again and again. Stay safe. Please, stay safe. (And that used to be due to this damned virus, now it’s the other virus)

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Right before I read this post, I happened to read a FB comment by someone local who thought burning down our university hospital (and defacing the local sports stadium) was a good thing/ great place to start…so, me, being the naturally curious person that I am, decided to look on their personal facebook page to see what makes a person like that tick. What an eye opener. Living in fairytale land. Basically, this person (and her friends) believe that the whole world order currently needs to be torn down and rebuilt into a community of love, where love and mutual respect can flourish. That means no more police departments, yada, yada… (this is a young college educated age woman) and no you do not need to stay silent/ EVER.. blessings on you LA

    Liked by 4 people

    1. @DM, have no idea if we are talking about the same place(and you don’t have to say), but sounds very similar to vandalism in my area. It also included in my area defacing a statue of a man who died fighting the Nazis.
      The University Hospital in my area serves people from all over the state and even people from other parts of the country. Probably one of the largest employers in the area.
      Protesters in my area are now allowed to march on interstate exits. Who cares about truckers or people trying to get to their hospital jobs. Who cares that all the money that is being spent in these protests/clean up could go to other things….like more education for police departments.
      The only people that seem to profit from this are the spray paint manufacturers and the glass/window repair guys.

      Liked by 3 people

    2. That’s a group of true idealists Doug. Wouldn’t starting over be an amazing and clearly inclusive way to level the field and insure equality. The problem is that we have history and unless history and our population is wiped clean idealistic plans are nearly impossible. It only takes on person learning about marginalizing a group of people based on difference to spark our entire social history and reignite injustice and inequality. I would wonder where she/they see themselves in this process and how they would determine who and what stays or goes.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. We don’t rewrite history. We learn from it. Say we burn everything to the ground. Who rebuilds it? How do we rebuild it.

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      2. And we are back to my earlier thoughts. We are Supposed to learn from it, yet that seems elusive to so many. Yet on the basis of knowledge surrounding how societies evolve organically, and how power structures are formed, eventually humans would return to the same form of social order we live in now.

        Liked by 1 person

    3. If you are talking about U of I and Kinnick Stadium, I believe I have read the same FB post and it so sad. If I recall the area, the children’s hospital is across the street, hoping those kids didn’t see the ordeal.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Yep, I hadn’t thought about that aspect of it. As if the hospitalized children and their families don’t have enough to worry about. Now the families are most likely worried about safely entering and exiting the building. The children’s hospital is part of a large teaching hospital for those not familiar with the area, and had a direct view of the “protests”.

        Liked by 2 people

  7. Please keep in mind that the majority of the protesters are peaceful and want to peacefully march and have their voices heard. It is sad that there are those who are taking advantage of the situation and are violent and damaging property. There are far more peaceful people on the streets then not.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. People have lost their businesses, their ability to take care of their families, more people have been killed and injurned in the name of freedom and justice. My heart breaks for the violence I am seeing take place on the streets.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. So I have been talking about the University of Iowa in some of my previous comments but hadn’t mentioned the place before. “Protesters” spray painted a statue of Nile Kinnick, a former football player who died at the age of 24 during WW2. Photos of the “protesting” last night clearly show it was a white individual doing the spray painting of the Nile Kinnick statue. Many of the protesters in our area are white. I have to believe many of them are just in it for the anarchy aspect, rather than to work for actual change. I also that someone had spray painted “Hear us or fear us”, whatever that means.

    I also believe that a lot of the liberal people in our area like the FB poster mentioned in DM’s comment have been willfully ignorant of the undercurrent of racism in our area and really have done nothing previously to try to change it. I could say much more about this but it would turn into a too long didn’t read comment.

    I consider myself left of center, but not liberal.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The rioters in my neighborhood have been mainly white, and judging by the footwear, clearly not poor. I don’t think it’s a statement against police brutality or racism. I think it’s a statement against something else.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You’re onto something LA this is bigger than one death, as a young man I went to soccer matches in the violent 80’s, an era of crowd hooliganism and running battles with the police……. I can tell you being part of a crowd fighting other fans, running battles in the streets baying for the blood of opposing supporters IS thrilling, yes fun also exciting although I didn’t do any fighting or bottle throwing………… lol just so as you know!!

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  10. While I do not like to see the damage and violence being done, I think that there is so much more to it than what you see in images or, in what seems to be your case, outside your window. If you haven’t seen it yet, you might look for Trevor Noah’s video and his comments on the subject. It gave me a very different perspective on it and I can understand on a much deeper level a lot of they whys that might be behind some of this. Along with this is also the understanding that it is only one of many, many possible reasons you are seeing that violence and destruction.

    But keep in mind, there is a whole lot more peaceful happening and a lot of that is based on how local leaders are handling things. I’ve seen a drastic turn around in what is going on in my city because our local government saw some problems and made some dramatic changes in how it responded to situations. This is such a hugely complex issue with so many moving parts that all change how something can be perceived or the mood of a crowd.

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    1. I don’t understand throwing bricks. I don’t understand looting stores. I don’t understand defacing things. This is my neighborhood. This is where I live. I see it with my eyes. My friends are seeing it with their eyes. We are living this. While there are no simple answers I can not condone looting and throwing bricks and condoning arson. If we burn everything down, will it be different when we rebuild?

      Liked by 2 people

  11. I saw a picture this morning in the Minneapolis Star Tribune of Ali Barbarawi standing in the smoldering rubble of his dental clinic that served over 2,000, mostly low income residents. He begged 911 to send help that night..they told him 6am was likely the earliest they could get there..(take note, all “de-fund the police” fans)

    Ali’s office was just one of the 500 businesses looted, damaged or destroyed.

    Heard someone say our cities need to be burned to the ground so they can be more equitably and appropriately rebuilt.. Can’t wait to hear what they’ll put where the dental clinic once was.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m still at a loss as to why people are demonstrating in major British cities? But there you are perhaps I suffer from the condition called ‘white privilege’?

    …………… as an aside a statue of Winston Churchill on Parliament Green was defaced with graffiti, like you said I think fringe anarchists take the opportunity, they turn up to the demos, fight the police, get on the telly and do criminal damage BUT they’re morons, defame Churchills name and all public support evaporates…… like I said leftwing morons!!

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  13. I don’t think violence solves the problem. I think it draws attention to voices that went unheard. I won’t say that it’s right, yet I will say the sound of it can cut through the noise and allow pain to be witnessed.
    It’s complicated. Which sounds trite, I know. I will say I do understand both sides of the issue. I’ve seen too much in my life to NOT understand both sides if the issue.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I don’t condone violence. I WILL say this… Those who are violent and destroying property are not “the majority of protesters”. They seem to be all anyone focuses on though. I will also say the MULTIPLE attempts for blacks to be heard (the purpose for these protests) has failed. If you look back into history, you’d see that. For this reason, black people are STILL dying unjustly! Those who’ve KILLED black people are STILL walking days, weeks, months, after killing a black person. It’s not right. And that’s our history.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Just like the majority of whites are not racist. Just like the majority of cops are not bad. I don’t think throwing garbage in front of my building is helping. I don’t think setting fires is helping. I don’t think destroying stores is helping. If people think this is the way to enact change and bring about reform, they are allowed to think that. I personally don’t see how that will ever work. But I respect your opinion.

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      1. You are focusing on the small percentage of people doing this… You missed the fact, most people are not doing this… And MANY protesting don’t agree with it either. It’s happening; therefore, Someone sees it… You get to choose what you focus on.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I live in a city full,of violent protests. I see this with my own eyes. In the city where I live. It is what I focus on because it is what I am living right now. Not on tv. Not on social media. On my block. By the farmers market in my neighborhood. By stores that I frequent. Yes I’m focusing on it. It’s hard not to.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Your truth is different than mine. Don’t project this violence as if it’s ALL that’s happening… As if it’s EVERYONE that’s out in the street. There was thousands in Minneapolis that weren’t violent.

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  15. @Nova, this is LA’s blog, and these events are happening nearby where she lives.. She can focus on what she likes, and we can all choose to read or not read. I live in a smallish Midwestern college town…definitely many people out there seeking to be disruptive, vandalize and cause chaos. Where I live many of these protesters are white. Where I live “protesters” think it is appropriate to wander out on to the interstate, and these were a large bunch. People vandalizing a hospital…a large bunch. People wandering through town and blocking a major intersection and spray painting the f word where ever they go..another large bunch.
    Yes there are peaceful protesters. There are also people causing anarchy and chaos. Why can’t people tell those stories? Not really sure why truck drivers have to have their workday delayed because protesters think they should wander out on to the interstate. Truck drivers are simply trying to get food and other goods to all of us.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I can’t stand the idea of violence. With all of the history involved with systemic racism and that fact that we have NEVER been heard (peaceful protests have been done before on this issue) I Completely understand it. The violence is just a small % of what is currently happening. There are thousands upon thousands of people peacefully protesting. Please try and understand why it is happening and how you would feel if this incident happened to someone you loved.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. If you get a chance…read my post today. I am aware of people being treated unfairly and I do not accept it at all. But the death of David Dorn? I don’t understand how that makes things better. I don’t think violence will reach the people most in need of re-education regarding issues of hate and intolerance. I’ve seen children of abuse grow up to be Abusers….bullied kids beating the crap out of those weaker.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Well, you certainly started an interesting discussion with this post! Lots of different perspectives, and most of them trying to be polite and to recognize the validity of other people’s points of view. (Of course there are some who are telling you to keep quiet or that you’re just wrong, but there are always small-minded people.) But overall, I think this is the sort of discussion that is helpful.

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